Wednesday, 30 June 2010

Canongate Books' Living Archive

Scottish publisher Canongate Books, established in 1973, has created a new 'Living Archive' in conjunction with the University of Dundee, which will hold the firm's business papers, accounts, book drafts, proposals, artwork and more.

The Business Acrhives Scotland blog has the full story at http://businessarchivesscotland.blogspot.com/2010/06/living-archive-dundee-university.html.

If you are a firm that does not quite appreciate why retaining your records may be of use to future generations, please contact Business Archives Council for Scotland at bacs@archives.gla.ac.uk or Kiara King of the Ballast Trust at Kiara.King@glasgow.ac.uk, where you can gain advice on the value of certain records types, preservation and more.

NB: Congratulations to David Powell, formerly of BACS, who has moved to Stornoway to take up the post of Project Manager for the new Archives Service of the Western Isles.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

New National Library of Ireland catalogue

The National Library of Ireland has a new online catalogue, searchable at http://catalogue.nli.ie/.

From the site's introduction page:

This single discovery interface enables you to search across the Library's catalogued collections simultaneously - Printed Books including Official Publication, visual material including Prints & Drawings, Photographs, Ephemera, manuscripts catalogued since 1990 together with a growing body of digitised material including 33,000 images from the Lawrence, Independent H, Eason, Poole, Keogh, Clarke, Stereo Pairs and Tempest photographic collections.

Additional databases will be added on an ongoing basis in particular Sources and the Newspaper Database containing a listing of newspaper titles held in the National Library of Ireland, including information from the Newsplan Project.


The Advanced Search page at http://catalogue.nli.ie/Search/Advanced looks particularly useful!

Congrats to all involved...

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Derry e-Books on sale

Bob Forrest has been in touch to let me know that he has three eBooks available on the Ulster Heritage website at www.ulsterheritage.com/ebooks.htm, which may be of interest to those with Derry based ancestors.

The books are:

SCOTS-IRISH ORIGINS, 1600-1800 A.D.
GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS OF THE SCOTS-IRISH IN COUNTY LONDONDERRY, IRELAND.
PART ONE – VITAL RECORDS OF THE SCOTS-IRISH FROM THE PARISH OF MAGILLIGAN, COUNTY LONDONDERRY, 1600-1800 $9.95

SCOTS-IRISH ORIGINS, 1600-1800 A.D.
GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS OF THE SCOTS-IRISH IN COUNTY LONDONDERRY, IRELAND.
PART TWO – THE PLANTATION OF LONDONDERRY, c.1600-1670 $10.95

SCOTS-IRISH ORIGINS, 1600-1800A.D.
GENEALOGICAL GLEANINGS OF THE SCOTS-IRISH IN COUNTY LONDONDERRY, IRELAND
PART THREE - ‘THE MAIDEN CITY’
THE INHABITANTS OF THE CITY OF DERRY / LONDONDERRY BEFORE THE SIEGE (c.1600-1688) $9.99

You can never have enough good books on Derry really! :) (My gran's county!)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

The Law of Succession - Sir Iain Moncreiffe of that Ilk

I've just obtained a preview copy of what will soon be one of the most definitive Scottish genealogical releases of the year, The Law of Succession, by Sir Iain Moncrieffe of that Ilk (1919-1985).

The book, at almost 300 pages, is subtitled Origins and Background of the Law of Succession to Arms and Dignities in Scotland and was written by Sir Iain, formerly the Albany Herald of Arms, for his degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh in 1958. It is essentially split into two sections, the first dealing with succession before Scots Law, in the time of the Picts, the Cymry and the Gaels, and then with succession after the introduction of Scots Law, through discussion on the practice in earldoms, baronies, peerages, the monarchy and the Heirs of Law to Arms.


I'll be reviewing the book for a forthcoming issue of Discover my Past Scotland, but I've attached a sneak preview of the cover. When released (there's been a slight delay from this month's release) it will cost a hefty £60, but will be one of the genealogical events of the year.

Keep your eyes peeled for the review, and on Birlinn's site at www.birlinn.co.uk - the book will be published under the company's John Donald imprint.

(Thanks to Birlinn)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Access demand for 1921 census

"He can’t be bargained with, can’t be reasoned with. He doesn’t feel pity or remorse, and he absolutely will not stop - ever."

For some, that is a classic movie quote description of The Terminator. To me, however, I like to think of it as describing the continuing efforts of genealogical bloodhound Guy Etchells! Not content with obtaining the release in England and Wales of the 1911 census and the 1939 National Register, Guy is now turning his attention to plugging the gap in the middle - the 1921 census.

In times of economic stress such as these the government might be open to any idea that could generate useful revenue and the 1921 census is one such project.

A way to generate income, provide jobs and boost the economy all at the same time without making cuts. Such a policy must be popular with the electorate.

The National Audit Office report on the release of the 1901 census stated that the internet access to the 1901 generated revenues of £4.5 million by October 2003, less than one year. In five years that amounts to a conservative sum of £22.5 million and useful figure for even a government to play with.

I would therefore like to suggest a campaign to encourage the government to release the 1921 now. Now is the time to write to Cabinet Ministers and Members of Parliament - we may be able to obtain a change in policy.

If you want access to the 1921 census now is possibly the only time to act. Write to your MP and/or other Members of Parliament.

House of Commons,
London,
SW1A 0AA.

Even people from overseas can write to MPs.

Cheers
Guy

I suspect that in today's climate, nothing is impossible. For details on your locally elected representatives, see www.theyworkforyou.com/mps/


(With thanks to Guy Etchells)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Banffshire History Festival coming soon

With thanks to Alison Smith for the following:

BANFFSHIRE HISTORY FESTIVAL
31st July/1st August 10am-4pm
Banff Castle, Castle Street, Banff AB45 1DL

There will be a variety of Exhibits/Displays/Stalls, including:

Ancient & Royal Charters, Maps & Photographs
Desert Rats, Living History Display
3D film of Georgian Banff
Archaeology of North East Scotland
Townscape Heritage Initiative
Family History Research
Pitsligo Castle Trust
Armoured Car
Cullen Deskford & Portknockie Heritage Society
Buckie & District Fishing Heritage Society
Banff Preservation & Heritage Society

There will also be a Grand Auction at 2pm on Saturday, of Goods, Collectables, Furniture, tools etc.

The following is the Programme of Talks & Recitals for the event:

Saturday
10.30am - Buckie Blethers - Recitations from their Anthology
12.00 noon - Shona MacLean – History’s Place in Fiction
1.30pm - Maureen Shearer - Family History Research
3.00pm - Charles Burnett - Introduction to Heraldry

Sunday
10.30am - Alison Smith - Gene Genie Scotland - Frugal Family History
12.00 noon - James Wyness - The Battle of Harlaw
1.30pm - David Miller - Legacy of Robert Adam on N.E. Scotland
3.00pm - Charles Burnett - Forbes of Pitsligo

And there will be Family Entertainment with Music, Dance & Street Theatre, and a Café open 10am-4pm

For more information contact banffcastle@yahoo.co.uk Tel: 01261 815325

Further details soon at www.banffcastle.org.uk


Sounds like a fun weekend!

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Scottish GENES blog

I missed a trick when I first started this blog over two and a half years ago, so better late than never to sort it I suppose!

Scottish Genealogy News and Events does what it says on the tin, but has always been a bit of a mouthful, and SGNE as its abbreviation looks like some long lost DNA sequence. So - welcome now to the slightly rebranded Scottish GENES blog! A bit shorter, punchier, just about works as an acronym and actually has some form of meaning in its own right...!

Don't forget that you can subscribe to this blog using the link on the right side of this page, and can follow it on your blog list also if you have a Google account (just scroll down a bit further to find the link).

And there is plenty more news to come in the months ahead...! If you have a product you wish to promote, an event you wish to publicise or some juicy news you wish to pass on, do get in touch at enquiry @ scotlandsgreateststory.co.uk - the service is completely free.


Half the battle is knowing what records to source for your research; the other half is keeping people appraised of developments that can help with research in a fast changing family history landscape - this blog is just trying to do its bit for the cause...! :)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Am Baile on Facebook

The Am Baile website has its own Facebook page, and has just announced its 500th follower.

A great site, with lots of snippets from the Highland archives...

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)


17th Century shoe discovered on Canna

A shoe dating to the mid 17th century has been discovered under a bed on the Isle of Canna!

The shoe, labelled incorrectly as Queen Mary's Shoe, was located in a box under a bed of the former house of Margaret Fay Shaw, who with her husband John Lorne Campbell collected one of the largest archives of Gaelic culture.

For more on the story visit http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/highlands_and_islands/10458943.stm.

NB: There is no truth to the theory that the islanders had a badly printed bible describing the virtues of Faith, Hop and Charity, with the greatest of these being Hop (sorry, very old Red Dwarf joke!) :)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Census, Church and City - SAFHS 2011 conference

The 22nd annual conference of the Scottish Association of Family History Societies, entitled Census, Church and City, will be hosted by the Scottish Genealogy Society on Saturday June 26th 2011, from 09.30-16.30 at Adam House, 3 Chambers Street, Edinburgh EH1 1HR.

As well as a family history fair there will be a packed talks programme, with talks on Edinburgh City Archives, Scottish Episcopal Church records, the Scottish Roman Catholic Archives and the 1911 Scottish census. Definitely one to attend.

Further information is available at www.scotsgenealogy.com/Conference.aspx - and check out the Scottish Genealogy Society's swish new website whilst you are there at www.scotsgenealogy.com!


To book a place, download the booking form from the SAFHS website at www.safhs.org.uk/Documents/SGS_SAFHS_Conference_Booking_Form.pdf - tickets at £15 each.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Moray and Nairn FHS website

Moray and Nairn Family History Society was established in 2009, but when I was compiling a list of FHSs for my recent Scottish genealogy guide at the start of the year it had still to create a website.

I've just discovered that it in fact now does have a website live at www.morayandnairnfhs.co.uk, with some resources that may be of interest, such as a list of Canadian marriages in Nairnshire and past issues of the society's newsletter, as well as information on the society itself.

The society will also be co-hosting the Nairn Family History Fair on Saturday October 2nd at the Nairn Community Centre, from 10.30 am - 4.30 pm. There will be several vendor and society stands, as well as a talks schedule - full details on the society's diary page.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Methil Library temporary closure of Family History Room

Fife Family History Society has posted a note on its website at www.fifefhs.org to say that the Family History Room at Methil Library will be closing in August and not reopening until building work is complete there in early 2011. The society is advising that books, microfilms and readers will be temporarily moved to Leven Library throughout the closure.

Amongst the room's holdings are various items of genealogical interest, including many Fife OPR microfilms, census microfilms, microfilms of local newspapers to the Levenmouth area, the IGI and many books and other resources. The society's collections are incorporated there also - see www.genuki.org.uk/big/sct/FIF/libraries/Methil_lib.htm for more on the library's holdings.

(With thanks to Fife FHS)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Worrying change to Canadian 2011 census

The 2011 census in Canada is being changed, seemingly without consultation, and upsetting several genealogists in the process.

The modern Canadian census arrives in two forms - the short questionnaire, targetting 80% of the population with eight basic questions (birth, marital status, etc), and the long questionnaire, targetting the remaining 20%, but with up to 53 additional questions going into considerably more detail. It now looks like the long questionnaire is getting the chop, and being replaced with a voluntary National Household Survey, to be collated by Statistics Canada, though all will receive he short questionnaire. The new NHS form will not be subject to the legislation surrounding censuses, meaning that information on those who fill out the NHS rather than the short questionnaire will never be released. A third of the population will be sent the NHS, rather than the 20% that previously filled in the long questionnaire.

The full story is in the Vancouver Sun story, Genealogists slam new restrictions on Canadian census information
.

A useful piece of general advice, no matter where you are filling in your next census form - fill it in, photocopy it, and lock the copy safely away - you never know, in a century's time (92 years in Canada's case), it may turn out to be the only copy accessible for your descendants to see...

(With thanks to Genealogynews at Twitter)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Monday, 28 June 2010

London Lives site online

A new website from the University of Sheffield deals with the lives of 'plebeian Londoners' from 1690-1820, but may also help if your Scottish relatives made their way down south to the English capital.

240,000 manuscript pages from eight London archives, plus a further 15 datasets, can all be searched at the London Lives site, available at www.londonlives.org, by name or keyword.

Worth a play...!

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Researching Scottish Family History - not out of stock!

When I was at a family history fair in Troon a couple of weeks back, several people I spoke to told me they had been unable to get a hold of my book Researching Scottish Family History; when they had tried to buy it from Amazon.co.uk a dreaded message had appeared saying 'Temporarily Out of Stock'.

In fact, you can purchase it from Amazon - under the 'Temporarily Out of Stock' message look below and you will see a link saying '2 new from £7.95'. Once you click on this two options will appear - the first 'Temporarily Out of Stock' - forget that, it's a waste of space! The second option is the one you want, which will allow you to order up a copy. It's to do with the publisher not selling direct to Amazon, or something like that (I've given up asking!). Apologies if you have experienced this, I only wrote the thing...! :)

However, don't forget that you can get it without postage and packing if you avail yourself of the reader's offer in the July issue of Discover my Past Scotland magazine (see last post).

If still having problems, the following vendors also have the book:

Family History Partnership - www.familyhistorypartnership.com/prod141.htm

The National Archives at Kew - www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/bookshop/details.aspx?titleId=1075

The ScotlandsPeople Centre bookshop in Edinburgh

Parish Chest - www.parishchest.com/shop/index.php?cmd=showoffer&id=P89322

Blackwell's - http://bookshop.blackwell.co.uk/jsp/id/Researching_Scottish_Family_History/9781906280222

Manchester and Lancashire FHS - www.bookshop.mlfhs.co.uk/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=58&products_id=1189

Institute of Heraldic and Genealogical Studies - www.ihgs.ac.uk/shop/index.php/Books/occupational

GENFair - www.genfair.co.uk/product_details.php?pid=33772

Hope that helps!

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Discover my Past Scotland issue 21 on sale

The July issue of online magazine Discover my Past Scotland (issue 21) has gone on sale at www.discovermypast.co.uk.

In this month's issue John Hannavy looks at early Scottish tourism, Michelle Higgs traces Scottish Jewish ancestors, Caroline Makein examines family heirlooms, Wendy Glass finds out about the first women students, Ruth Symes looks at Edinburgh in the 1840s, and Katie Howard finds family history resources in Ayrshire.


There's also an extract from yours truly's book Researching Scottish Family History, looking at the basics of Scottish heraldry, and there's also a great reader offer for my book at £7.95 only, with no charge for postage and packing. Yours truly also provides the latest Scottish genealogical news and product reviews, and all the other regulars are there also, including Q&As, events and bygone days.

It doesn't matter that Andy Murray is still playing at Wimbledon, buy it anyway - the man does sleep, and what better way can you inform and entertain yourself until he wakes up again?!!!

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Sunday, 27 June 2010

ScotlandsPeople Centre website revamped

The website for the ScotlandsPeople Centre in Edinburgh has been revamped, making it considerably easier to navigate around.

As well as placing the most common FAQs in the Help section, the main navigation tabs have been substantially revamped. The Famous Scots tab links to details on those featured in the exhibition last year of the same name, but also the new Famous Scots Archives, which will be added to in future with details of many other prominent Scots. The About the records tab now contains summary details of all records collections made available by the centre's many contributing partners, whilst the Research tab has all the background info to these resources, such as lists of OPRs, parish and district lists, and more.

On the left of the main home screen are links to pages on the centre itself - and do take a look at the new Archivists' Garden section, "a unique garden planted with 57 plant species - all connected in some way to Scotland's collective memory, whether through myth and folklore, heraldry, or association with individual famous Scots". Something the internet will never truly convey!

The ScotlandsPeople Centre site is located at www.scotlandspeoplehub.gov.uk.



Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Whithorn 1851 census entries online

Maxwell Ancestry has uploaded transcribed entries from 1851 for the Wigtownshire parish of Whithorn.

For more see http://scottishgenealogyblog.blogspot.com/2010/06/census-update-whithorn-1851-now-online.html

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Friday, 25 June 2010

ScotlandsPeople Centre User Group minutes

The ScotlandsPeople Centre User Group minutes from April 9th 2010 are now available here.

I was slightly amused to read point 7.3 - "Some concerns were raised that the opening of local family history centres may impact on the availability of jobs for professional genealogists". There are plans to link local family history centres across Scotland to the ScotlandsPeople Centre computer system, though the same minutes note that there is currently a delay in this due to problems setting up secure internet connections.

However, the fact that access will soon be spread across Scotland by such a method will, in my opinion, in fact benefit professional genealogists working more locally across Scotland. At present I have to pass on a travel charge to customers if I need to do research at the ScotlandsPeople Centre, but when the digitised vital records are made available at the local Burns Monument Centre in Kilmarnock or the Mitchell Library in Glasgow, those costs will be reduced and make such work more competitive for researchers across Scotland. There will always be cases where I need to do work in Edinburgh - there are additonal resources at the ScotlandsPeople Centre, as well as the National Archives of Scotland and the National Library, which are equally important - but there are also times when work can be done at a more local centre equally as well, which will benefit both the customer and researcher alike.

The genealogy world is moving on into the 21st century, and it quite rightly should no longer be the exclusive remit of those who can get to Edinburgh to be able to work as professional genealogists. If you are in Inverness, the Borders, the west of Scotland or perhaps even the islands, access will greatly benefit researchers. It may disadvantage some of the old order in Edinburgh - but it will bring many new opportunities to the rest of Scotland, and greatly accelerate access to the resources of ScotlandsPeople for all of Scotland's people. Genealogy today is now about the democratisation of history and the democratisation of access to our history. And I can only see that as a truly great thing.


Also discussed in the minutes - enhancements to the ScotlandsPeople computer system, the 1911 Scottish census, the digitised Valuation Rolls from 1855-1915, more wills digitisation from 1902-1925, the soon to happen replacement of DIGROS based computers in the Dundas Room, and some new 'getting started' workshops for those new to genealogy.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

More free FindmyPast this weekend

From FindmyPast's Twitter feed:

World Cup widows part 4: register on findmypast by midnight Sat 26 June and enjoy 90 mins free access between 9am Sun and 9am Mon

To register, visit www.FindmyPast.co.uk.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Scottish 1750-1850: Beyond the OPRs - Pharos course

Hi folks, still time to sign up to my next online Pharos course which commences on July 6th and runs for five weeks, price £43.99. Here's the summary:

Scotland 1750 - 1850: Beyond the OPRs (#302)

This is an intermediate level course in Scottish family history for those who are going back beyond 1850. You should have some experience with research in the Old Parochial Registers of the Church of Scotland and in using major websites for Scottish research.


This course discusses sources that fill the gap when the OPRs are uninformative or missing; for example, records of parish and town administration, occupations, land transfer and taxation.

Using these records involves several different locations. You will learn how to check online finding aids and how to find the most effective way to obtain records that may be online, in print, on CD or microfilm.

This is the second course on Scottish research. If you have not taken Scottish Research Online please check its description.

Instructor: Chris Paton

• Kirk Sessions records and parish poor
• Burgh records and town poor
• Occupations, taxation and early lists
• Land transfer and the value of sasines
• Land, inheritance and estates

Each lesson includes exercises and activities; a minimum of 1 one-hour chat session per week.

For more information, and to sign up, visit www.pharostutors.com.

Hopefully see you there!

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Electric Scotland's Aois community

Some time ago Canadian based Electric Scotland's Aois community was launched online at www.scotchat.org. The site is going from strength to strength, and the main man behind it all, Alastair McIntyre, has revealed some details on latest developments in his current newsletter:

Here are a few highlights on what's coming in our new community...

We now have the arcade system installed and working with lots of new games.

We have enabled all forums with the TapaTalk app for mobile devices such as the iPhone and Blackberry so you can message on the go.

We're integrating a FaceBook hook up.

Our Links directory is now fully up and running.

The University of Guelph's Centre for Scottish Studies have taken out 7 forums and Simon Fraser University's Scottish studies have taken out 5 forums. We're also in discussions with the University of Otago in New Zealand.

Invites to get involved have been sent out this week to organizations around the world and also to Scotland. We're also in discussions with the Scottish Caucus in the US.

We've created a Calendar specifically for The University of Guelph and Simon Fraser University and also for Highland Games and Scottish Festivals.

The YouTube video link has been installed and so if you add a YouTube link to a message it will show as a Video when the message is read.

We've also populated a lot of forums with messages so you'll have something interesting to read when you login.

And our thanks go to our beta testers who have helped discover bugs and also helped to test out the facilities we'll be offering.

Still lots more to do and it didn't help that Steve put his back out but he's still confident we can meet our end of month deadline. The very last thing we'll be doing is to customize the look and feel of the site and complete our welcome letter that you'll receive when you register for an account. We're working with a graphic designer to help us get the design right.

So hopefully lots of you will want to join the new and permanent community... we're in this for the long haul.

Don't forget the excellent Electric Scotland site itself at www.electricscotland.com, which amongst its many offerings includes Groome's Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland and the first two sets of the Statistical Accounts of Scotland. And it is free to access!

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Thursday, 24 June 2010

Remembering Scotland at War

Remembering Scotland At War, a pioneering online museum with a social networking area particularly aimed at ‘capturing memories’, has been launched today by Museums Galleries Scotland.

The culmination of a three year project led by Museums Galleries Scotland, funded by the Big Lottery Fund and supported by the Imperial War Museum, Remembering Scotland At War features over 200 exhibitions, interviews, photographs and footage spanning from the Second World War to more recent conflicts including Iraq and Afghanistan. Accounts include personal stories of individuals, families and local communities.

To view the site visit at
www.rememberingscotlandatwar.org.uk

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Ten years married!

Well with genealogy, it all boils down to family in the end - and on that score, today is my tenth wedding anniversary to the lovely-but-slightly-weird Claire from Kilkenny!

Happy anniversary Claire - love ye loads! :)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Russell James joins Ancestry.co.uk

One of genealogy's good guys has signed up to Ancestry.co.uk as the new copy manager. Russell James was for the last three years the editor of Your Family Tree magazine (Your Family History overseas), and successfully built on the format first established by Garrick Webster a couple of years before that to make it one of the most successful magazines around just now, certainly in genealogical circles. A huge congratulations to Russell on his new appointment!

Here's the man himself blogging about his new post: http://blogs.ancestry.com/uk/2010/06/18/new-at-ancestry/comment-page-1/#comment-320

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Wednesday, 23 June 2010

Scottish Monumental Inscriptions update

Helen and the team at Scottish Monumental Inscriptions have been busy recording images of gravestones in cemeteries across Fife and Angus, with the following included in their latest releases:

Barry Churchyard, Angus
Cameron, Fife
Ceres, Fife
Creich Churchyard, Fife
Cults Church and Cemetery, Fife
Dunbog Church and Flisk Church, Fife (together on 1 cd)
Dunino Churchyard, Fife
Kilconquhar Church and Cemetery, Fife
Kilmany Church and Cemetery, Fife
Moonzie Churchyard, Fife
Panbride Church and Cemetery, Angus

To order copies, visit www.scottish-monumental-inscriptions.com

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

More military content from Ancestry

Ancestry's been busy again on the military front!

Ancestry.co.uk, the UK’s number one family history website, has launched online the UK, Casualties of the Boer War, 1899-1902, detailing 55,000 British and colonial soldiers who were killed, wounded, captured, or who died of disease during the Second Boer War.

This collection of military records highlights the horror of the conflict; detailing the deaths of more than 20,000 British soldiers and the injuries of a further 23,000. Typically each record details the soldier’s name, rank, force, regiment, battalion and date and place of death, injury or capture.

Most of the other records are of capture or disease, which was rife in South Africa during the early 20th century. Dysentery, typhoid fever and intestine infections were among the most common contagions and account for around 12,000 deaths in the collection.

As well as death through sickness and battlefield injuries, the collection reveals some unusual ‘fates’ met by soldiers. These include records of 86 British troops who were killed or injured by lightning, including a mysterious case of two soldiers struck dead within moments of each other when a lightning storm swept their base in Stormberg near Cape Town. One soldier is even listed as having been eaten by a crocodile at the Usutu River.

As the number of deaths recorded in this collection correspond with the fatalities noted in other historical sources, this archive can be considered one of the most comprehensive resources of British soldiers in the Second Boer War available.

Anyone trying to find out more about an ancestor who fought in the Second Boer War will find these records invaluable, particularly as most British soldiers who fought in the conflict won’t appear in the 1901 Census of England and Wales because they were fighting in South Africa.

Following on from the First Boer War, the Second Boer War was a dispute over territory in South Africa, fought between the British Empire and Dutch settlers (known as ‘Boers’ – the Dutch word for ‘farmer’). The catalyst for this secondary conflict was the discovery of gold in the Boer-controlled South African Republic, also known as the Transvaal.

The resulting gold rush encouraged thousands of British settlers (known as uitlanders) to migrate to the republic. Before long the British numbers exceeded those of the Boer, prompting tension around ‘uitlander rights’ and which nation should control the gold mining industry. When the British refused to evacuate their forces in 1899, the Boer declared war.

The so-called 'Boers' were farmers who were used to riding and hunting for survival and were therefore considerable opponents for the British Army and claimed the lives of around 8,000 British soldiers. The Boer themselves lost 7,000 troops.

In an attempt to cut off supplies to the Boers, a 'scorched earth policy' was introduced. This resulted in the destruction of Boer farms and crops, and subsequent introduction of concentration camps where the Boer and African women, children and workers were interned. Thousands of Boers lost their lives here, primarily through malnutrition and disease.


and

Ancestry.co.uk, the UK’s number one family history website, has launched online the Gateshead, Durham, England, Roll of Honour, 1914-1920, detailing the heroics of more than 4,000 soldiers from Gateshead who fought in the First World War.

The records are a collection of newspaper clippings, photographs and names of soldiers from Gateshead (then part of Durham) who served between 1914 and 1920. Most of the clippings include a portrait profile picture of the soldier, information on their unit, rank and status and whether they were wounded, killed or reported missing.

In some instances the records provide details on the soldier's service, awards and even group photographs. One such photograph features the local Gateshead police force pictured together before they went off to fight on the Western Front.

Whilst most of the soldiers in the collection are privates (2,265), the collection features all ranks, including Gunners, Brigadier Generals, Seaman, Signallers, Doctors and even Pipers.

These rolls of honour were originally compiled by a publisher who usually would have charged a fee for each entry, meaning that not every soldier will appear in the records. However, detailing over 4,000 of Durham’s First World War soldiers, this collection is one of the most comprehensive archives of its type available.

The Gateshead, Durham, England, Roll of Honour, 1914-1920 was transcribed as part of the Ancestry World Archives Project, which provides the public with indexing software and training support to enable them to contribute in making even more historical records available and searchable online. To date, thousands of Britons have contributed their time to this project.

(With thanks to Annabel Bernhardt at Ancestry)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Tuesday, 22 June 2010

Changes to ScotlandsPeople Centre computer system

Several new changes will be fully operational as of tomorrow, Wednesday June 23rd, on the ScotlandsPeople Centre computer system.

As of tomorrow:

i) It will be possible to go year up and year down if a single year is requested for all statutory data types.

ii) There are buttons that allow you to go to the previous or the next census from the result screen. Also, when it takes you to the next census it automatically adds or takes away 10 years from the year range to allow for the ageing process. See screengrab below:


iii) It will be possible for the census to browse a county rather than just a district. See below:


iv) OPR births now ask for 'Other Information' rather than mother's or father's name. Thus users simply need to insert a known surname. The additional information is shown in the 'Other details' column.


v) Finally, the browser will automatically close when a user logs out to ensure that each customer's search history is deleted (just in the browser - not in favourites) at the end of their session and is not visible to anyone else.


All very welcome developments!


(With thanks to Dee Williams at the ScotlandsPeople Centre)


Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Monday, 21 June 2010

Certificate of Irishness

If you are a fan of Plastic Paddy syndrome, this one is definitely for you...!

The Irish Times has reported that the Irish Government is going to go ahead with plans to introduce a "certificate of Irishness". You pay a fee for the certificate, which can be applied for by the Irish diaspora. The initiative was first proposed at the Global Irish Economic Forum at Farmleigh last year. It is apparently not designed to raise much revenue (ahem!), and is to benefit those who live abroad who have Irish heritage which they wish to proudly display to their families. OK, fair enough, Scotland's GRO has a Book of Scottish Connections, a similar deal.

However, here's the bit which I suspect will stick in the craw - "The department is investigating the possibility that certificate-holders would benefit from discounts while visiting Ireland as tourists." What if an Irish person resident in Ireland and actively contributing on a daily basis to the Irish economy turns up with an Irish birth certificate or an Irish passport - isn't that proof enough?! Would he or she then have to buy a certificate of Irishness to show the same thing? Nuts...! And what about tourists who don't have a connection - isn't it just plain racist to discriminate against them when it comes to dishing out discounts?
Not sure this has been fully thought through!

The full story is at www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/frontpage/2010/0621/1224272953828.html.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Sunday, 20 June 2010

New National Archives Labs website

The National Archives at Kew has launched a new website, The National Archives Labs, designed to test prototype projects and to develop new resources. It has launched with several new databases - the UK Photo finder (14,000 photos from the 1920s-40s), a Valuation Office Survey map ordering tool, and a new person search facility.

The site is at http://labs.nationalarchives.gov.uk/wordpress/, whilst further information behind its creation can be read at www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/news/468.htm.

(With thanks to TNA's Twitter page.)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Saturday, 19 June 2010

English and Welsh BMD indexes updated

A few months ago Ancestry (www.ancestry.co.uk) radically overhauled its English and Welsh BMD indexes to make them fully searchable. Prior to this the index pages had been digitised, but each page was only indexed by the first and last name on that page, meaning that it often took a while to browse through several pages per quarter until you found the right entry. The new index, produced in collaboration with FreeBMD, made a huge difference in that each individual entry was suddenly searchable, and in the case of marriages, could be cross-referenced with a spouse's surname.

Now FindMyPast and The Genealogist have joined the party. FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) will shortly be uploading new fully searchable birth indexes, to be followed by equivalent upgrades for its marriage and death indexes, as well as providing newly digitised index pages also. The Genealogist (www.thegenealogist.co.uk) has already uploaded new fully searchable marriage indexes from 1930 onwards, will expand that back to 1837 in the very near future, and will in due course then add new birth indexes.

FindmyPast has also taken the opportunity to introduce a new credit charge for its pay-per-view system. From the press release:

As well as these improvements, we will be simplifying the pricing of our PayAsYouGo records from 1 July 2010.

Currently there are over 10 different price bands for records which can be quite confusing. From July we will have fewer price bands, grouped into multiples of 5 credits, for example, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30.

In most cases the changes will result in a slight increase in credit prices, in some instances there will be a reduction, and some records will stay the same (for example, 1911 census and passenger lists). Viewing a BMD result will cost 5 credits instead of 1, but thanks to the full indexing of the BMDs, overall a BMD search will cost you less, as you will need to view far fewer records to find the one you want.


(With thanks to Nigel Bayley at The Genealogist and Amy Sell at FindmyPast)


Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Friday, 18 June 2010

Researching Scottish Family History - Facebook page

Thanks to military historian Paul Reed, for the idea of creating a Facebook page about my Researching Scottish Family History book. The site contains details of the book and some reviews, and can be accessed here.

My new book Tracing Your Family History on the Internet is also coming along nicely, I received the first proof of the cover art for it today, and it's looking good! It will be published by Pen and Sword in the next few months - more details soon.

In the meantime, check out the cover art for Paul Reed's new book Great War Lives, also forthcoming from Pen and Sword, on his own dedicated Facebook page here.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

What is Twitter?!

Lots of people may still be unaware of what Twitter's real purpose is in life. Thanks to Phil Jupitus (http://twitter.com/jupitusphillip) and Stephen Fry (http://twitter.com/stephenfry) for providing the answer on their Twitter pages!



Ahem!

Don't forget that you can follow me at http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton and/or subscribe to this blog using the links to the right of this page!

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Scottish golf exhibition at National Library of Scotland

You may be one of those, who unlike me, thinks that golf is in fact NOT a good walk ruined! If so, hold onto your golfing umbrellas, as a new exhibition is getting underway just for you...

The National Library of Scotland is running an exhibition from June 18th to November 14th entitled A Swing Through Time: Golf in Scotland at George IV Bridge Building, Edinburgh, with admission free.

Opening hours:

Monday-Friday: 10.00-20.00
18 June only: closed from 16.00-1730
Saturday: 10.00-17.00
Sunday: 14.00-17.00

For more information see
www.nls.uk/exhibitions/golf/index.html.

I should add that I regularly get a hole in one - on a Nintendo Wii that is...!

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Free PRONI lectures

From the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland (www.proni.gov.uk):

OPEN LECTURES

The staff of the Public Record Office of Northern Ireland will be presenting a series of talks in the Lecture Theatre on the 22nd and 24th of June.

All Welcome

Tuesday 22nd 10.00am:
Getting what you want: How to use the E-Catalogue
Ann McVeigh

Thursday 24th 2.00pm
Landed Estate Records: An introduction for genealogists

Bethany Sinclair

Thursday 24th 3.30pm
Can these records be opened? ... FOI in the real world!
Gemma McCallion

All lectures are free and open to all.

(With thanks to Gavin McMahon at PRONI)

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Wednesday, 16 June 2010

More free FindmyPast for football widows

The last FindmyPast (www.findmypast.co.uk) football offer was clearly a bit popular - did anybody actually watch England play?! This time round, FindmyPast are ofering a 90 minute flexitime offer, letting you start when you like on the site on the day of the match. Here goes!

With the next England match just around the corner, we’re warming up to provide further entertainment for any non-football fans in the form of our second World Cup widows offer:

90 minutes free access to findmypast.co.uk at a time of your choice on the day that England play – when England play, you still don’t pay!*

How to get free access
- Make sure you are registered on the website before midnight (UK time) on the day before the match. If you have already registered, you do not need to do this again.
- Return to findmypast.co.uk at a time of your choosing between 9am (UK time) on the day of the match and 9am (UK time) the day afterwards.
- Once you have signed in, you will have 90 minutes to search and view the records for free.

The free 90 minutes are available as a continuous period and will begin the moment you sign into findmypast.co.uk between the times stated above. If you’re not in the UK, you can convert the UK times above into local time here. A listing of the scheduled England matches is available here.

Our World Cup Widows offer for the second England match is now much more flexible, particularly for those of you based outside of the UK. You are now able to use the records at findmypast.co.uk at a time that suits you. We’ve been working hard to improve the speed of the site after the overwhelming popularity of our first offer so that even more customers will be able to benefit from it.

Visit our World Cup page for more information. If you need a helping hand with your research, take a look at our video tutorials or our Getting Started page which provide advice and tips about using our records.

We'd love to hear about any discoveries you make while our records are free to view - post anything you'd like to share with us and our readers on our Facebook page.

Please pass this on to friends, family or anyone else you think might want to make the most of our free family history records.

*All records available using our Full subscription (including the 1911 Census) will be free: Living Relatives searches and Memorial scrolls are not included.

(Thanks to Amy at FMP)


Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Irish records from five counties added online

As noted a couple of days ago, further records have now been added to the Irish Genealogy site at www.irishgenealogy.ie. From the site's news page:

On 16th June 2010, Mary Hanafin T.D., Minister for Tourism, Culture and Sport and the Archbishop of Dublin, The Most Rev. Dr. John R.W. Neill, launched the remaining Church of Ireland records of Dublin City and counties Kerry and Carlow. Also, a subset of the Roman Catholic parishes in the Diocese of Cork & Ross have also been added.

In addition to these records, digital images of the original church records, relating to these areas, are now available to view on this website.

Working is progressing on the completion of the Dublin City and South & West Cork Roman Catholic records. The release of further records for on-line access will proceed on a phased basis. Please refer to the "Update of Progress" section in this website for news of upcoming releases.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Yetholm and Dumfries records from Maxwell Ancestry

Maxwell Ancestry has released two new publications which may help if your relatives came from Yetholm or Dumfries, but you can't find them in Church of Scotland records.

The Yetholm Burgher (New Light) Parish Register 1824-1855 costs just £6.99, and contains both baptisms and marriages.

The Dumfries Buccleuch Street United Presbyterian Church Baptisms 1846-1856 costs £5.99.

For more information visit http://scottishgenealogyblog.blogspot.com/2010/06/yetholm-burgher-new-light-parish.html and http://scottishgenealogyblog.blogspot.com/2010/06/parish-register-update-dumfries.html.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Josh Hanna promoted at Ancestry

Josh Hanna, previously General Manager of International and Senior Vice President at Ancestry.com in London, has been made Executive Vice President and Head of Global Marketing of the company, a post which he will take up in San Francisco.

For more, visit www.marketwatch.com/story/ancestrycom-inc-appoints-josh-hanna-executive-vice-president-and-head-of-global-marketing-2010-06-15?reflink=MW_news_stmp.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Aberdeen & NE Scotland FHS ancestral charts

Aberdeen and North East Scotland Family History Society has updated its family history charts index, with more than 84,000 entries. The index gives surname and location references for all members' charts in its library. The entries are referenced by membership number, meaning the file is only of use to Society members - however, if a name appears of interest, it may well be worthwhile signing up to the society!

To view the index, visit www.anesfhs.org.uk/download.htm.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Tuesday, 15 June 2010

Bloody Sunday victims were innocent

It's been a stain on the conscience of both Ulster and the British Government for decades, and perhaps its most divisive event, but today the published report of the Saville Inquiry into the events of Bloody Sunday, 30th January 1972, at a civil rights march in Derry, concluded that all thirteen members of the public shot by British paratroopers were completely innocent, as were the fourteen wounded, of whom one also died a few months later.

The innocent victims were:

Patrick 'Paddy' Doherty
Gerald Donaghy
John 'Jackie' Duddy
Hugh Gilmour
Michael Kelly
Michael McDaid
Kevin McElhinney
Bernard McGuigan
Gerard McKinney
William McKinney
William Nash
James Wray
John Young
John Johnston

For the BBC's coverage of the Saville Inquiry's report, see
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/northern_ireland/10321886.stm.

The report itself is available at www.bloody-sunday-inquiry.org.

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Monday, 14 June 2010

TNA's Wallace letter to be studied

On April 9th I posted a note directing people to a letter about William Wallace that had been placed online by the English based National Archives, via their Documents Online site - see http://scottishancestry.blogspot.com/2010/04/letter-concerning-william-wallace.html

The National Archives of Scotland has now announced that experts from Scotland, England and France are to investigate the 700 year old letter. A meeting will be held in August at TNA, and a seminar of top boffins will be held in spring 2011 to discuss findings. An exhibition will follow in 2012.

For more on the details see www.nas.gov.uk/about/100607.asp ; for more on the document itself visit
www.nas.gov.uk/documents/wallaceLetterImage.pdf and www.nas.gov.uk/about/100604.asp

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

More southern Irish records coming

From the Irish Genealogy website at www.irishgenealogy.ie:

The Minister for Tourism, Culture and Sport is pleased to announce the addition of further Church Genealogy Records on this website.

Church Baptism, Marriage and Burial records from pre-1900 are due to be added for Dublin City, Carlow, Cork (City and West Cork) and Kerry.

These additional records along with the digital image of these records will be launched by Mary Hanafin, TD, Minister for Tourism, Culture and Sport and the Archbishop of Dublin, The Most Rev. Dr. John R.W. Neill. This event will take place on Wednesday 16th June @6.00pm in St. Werburghs Church (near Christchurch) Dublin 2.


Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)

Hamefarin gets underway

Shetland's Hamefarin fortnight is now underway - for more, see http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/10304941.stm

Chris

www.ScotlandsGreatestStory.co.uk
Professional genealogical problem solving and research
http://twitter.com/ChrisMPaton
Researching Scottish Family History (New book)